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savyleartist:

Blessed be the publishers that put numbers on the spines of books in a series, put chronological lists in the title pages, and say “the first in the ____ series”

For they shall inherit the money of readers. Amen.
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sosuperawesome:

Illustrations for the Uppercase Planner by Simini Blocker on Tumblr

More like this
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“Don’t ever underestimate the power of your words. The power of a book. A library is not just a hall filled with paper and ink. It’s a fortress of light and darkness. It’s a weaponry of knights and angels. It’s a cave that offers protection during the storm. It’s the past, the present and the future and everything that could have been.”
- The Ágia Chronicles
Hadrian Hephaestus Nox (via l1na-k13)
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tabine:

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agenderchaseyoung:

topphobia:

poonpie:

mysticalkitten23:

babyfairy:

zamaron:

iont:

iminheavenwhenyoukissme:

angelaslayvis:

bodyglitter:

whats the worst book you’ve had to read for school

Grapes of wrath by far

I hated catcher in the rye.. my teacher was trying to get us to sympathize with holden but he wasnt likeable at all

“desire under the elms” sucked and so did “we”

1984

1984 sucked ass also reading through agamemnon made me want to die

I literally could not finish the Grapes of Wrath. It felt like literal torture to even attempt to read it. 

That Henry Thoreau bullshit

One Flew Over The Cuckcoo’s Nest was shit in like 8 different aspects and Shakespeare plays mainly because I Cannot Read

Brave new world is a bad and boring book lmao

of mice and men has scarred a fucking generation of american high school children and it should not be in our curriculum

i blocked of mice and men out of my memory so thoroughly that i forgot we even read it until i saw your comment

Ditto. I absolutely, positively hated Of Mice and Men. I threw it across the room after I finished it. My mom had never seen me so mad. 

The Iliad. It wasn’t so much the book itself - I rather enjoyed the story. It was the fact that I had to read the damn book three different times for three different classes. I was ready to jump up and down on it by the time the last class rolled around.
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truth-renowned:

@oohshinyfangirl, this made me think of you!
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Me entering a bookstore: *my skin clears, an ethereal glow emanates from my body, small woodland animals gather at my feet, I am at peace*
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crockpotcauldron:

crockpotcauldron:

crockpotcauldron:

crockpotcauldron:

Okay so I guess to counterbalance that series of rants, it is time for Werewolves I Am Totally Stoked About. Some of these stories have cute werewolves, and some have cute non-werewolves, but the point is, I really enjoyed them. 

The Cage, by A.M. Dellamonica - a community of lesbians rallies to protect a baby werewolf. It’s really heartwarming.

Surviving Frank, by David A. Page - it’s a buddy cop book, except one of the cops is a huge slobby werewolf. This is so up my alley.

Iron & Velvet, by Alexis Hall - light on the werewolves, but so many lesbians! What a fantastic urban fantasy novel, man. Where was this when I was hitting puberty. I hear it has a sequel, which is on my to-read list.

Prisoner, by Lia Silver - adorable werewolf marine gets kidnapped by secret government, accidentally winds up dating secret genetically engineered black ops agent god they are so cute together. It has sequels, also on my to-read list.

Fame and Misfortune, by Kel McDonald - can I just recommend Kel McDonald herself, because all of her werewolves are great. Fame and Misfortune has a big burly grumpy lesbian werewolf bodyguard, I love her and her accidentally-bitten maybe-werewolf maybe-girlfriend.

Sorcery 101, by Kel McDonald - more of a mixed urban fantasy story like Iron & Velvet, but plenty of werewolves, and they’re great and plenty of them are queer.

Misfits of Avalon, by Kel McDonald - okay, it’s a talking dog shapeshifter instead of a werewolf, but if I’ve convinced you to read the rest of Kel McDonald’s stuff, you’ll like this too.

Bisclavret, by Marie de France - an old timey poem with a werewolf who gets betrayed by his wife but then becomes the king’s buddy. I’m fond of this particular translation, but there are plenty of others. If you liked this story, Sir Marrok is a pretty similar one, except Arthurian flavored.

Bisclavret, by Kel McDonald - ha, did you think I was done reccing Kel McDonald because I totally wasn’t, she did a Bisclavret comic too.

Prague Race, by Petra Erika Nordlund - one of the main characters is a trans werewolf and there is an entire werewolf pack and I’m really stoked about it, you guys

Sing the Moon Down, by MasterLoki - Adorable witch and werewolf romance, and it’s queer too! 

Wilde Life, by Pascalle Lepas - Grumpy teenage werewolf in a red hoodie accidentally befriends a writer and gets dragged into supernatural shit.

How To Be A Werewolf, by Shawn Lenore - Werewolf barista discovers other werewolves for the first time, learns to control her powers, supernatural shit ensues.

The Glass Scientists, by Sabrina Cotugno - Rookie mad scientist is accidentally a werewolf, joins mad scientist community. 

Royal Bloodlines, by Mike Resnick - this is a great comedy piece about a werewolf in a dog show and I wholeheartedly recommend every line of it EXCEPT THE LAST ONE DANGIT MIKE.

Thor, by Wayne Smith - okay, the werewolf in this one is the evil serial killer type, but the protagonist is a German Shepherd and I really love him and his perspective. It’s a cute book and it made me cry.

Wolf Hunt, by Jeff Strand - another evil serial killer werewolf, but I’m in it for the buddy goons transporting the werewolf for the mob. A great comedy, but heads up for the awful gory bits. Ignore the sequel.

That’s a lot of cool werewolf stories (my god, Kel McDonald is a quarter of this list, protect her at all costs) to choose from, not counting the sequels. Don’t despair for the future of werewolf media, there are plenty of diamonds in the dogshit.

(Please god nobody add the Mercy Thompson series, the Bitten series, the Parasol Protectorate series, the Dresden Files, or the Kitty Norville series to this post. Been there, done that, never again.)

Alright, I read some more werewolf books on my to-read list.

Partner, by Lia Silver - the werewolf marine and the genetically engineered assassin are still cute together, you get a lot of great backstory and new werewolves, and all the setup with the plot and the supporting cast pays off. Definitely read this if you liked the previous one. There’s another one in the series with a different protag, but I’m not gonna get to it, so you’re on your own there.

Angel in the Attic, by Rebecca Tregaron (aka Lia Silver) - It is super cute, but it’s literally a third of a story. So there’s a cute lesbian werewolf, some sexual tension, a lot of interesting food, and a sex scene before it cuts off, but there are a ton of characters who get introduced, and conflicts set up, and worldbuilding explained, with no payoff. I’m sticking around in hopes of the next two books getting published, but if you don’t read works in progress, skip this one.

I’ve definitely read more werewolf books than this but there’s a limit on what I will admit to, let alone recommend to the internet at large.

OP here with more werewolf updates!

Shadows & Dreams, by Alexis Hall - turned out amazing, just as good as Iron & Velvet. werewolves aren’t the focus, but there are a few running around and they get a great fight scene, and there are plenty of lesbians

Weregirl, by C.D. Bell - awesome YA book about a girl on the track team who is accidentally elected champion of the wolves (via wolf bite) and has to untangle a local conspiracy.

More werewolves!

The Better To Find You With, by Kel McDonald - A werewolf wakes up in the pound and teams up with the overenthusiastic vet who patched up his silver bullet wound, trying to find a new werewolf and a werewolf hunter before it’s too late. It’s great to see recurring characters from Kel McDonald’s other werewolf comics, and this was really cute.

Mooncakes, by Suzanne Walker and Wendy Xu - a young witch who works in a bookstore is reunited with her nonbinary werewolf friend, and together they try to solve a magical mess

Still Waters by Alex Gabriel - honestly, this isn’t a werewolf book, it’s about a nix, but he does live in a town full of friendly werewolves and there’s a really cute puppy

The Changeling Prince, by Vivian Vande Velde - alright, I’ll finally admit to this one. It’s about a man/wolf/woobie raised by a witch who turns animals into people, and people into animals. When she takes over a town, he must choose whether to protect his new friends, at the risk of permanently losing his humanity.

Still on the to-read list:

Last Night at Wyrmwood High, by Kathleen Gros - I’ve read little bits of this as a webcomic, and it was great, so I’m gonna pick up the book when I can.

Bleeding Heart, by Sabrina Cotugno - I’ll get a copy sooner or later, stay tuned.
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archiemcphee:

Reading is one of the best things ever and bookworms are awesome.

heyboobooks

Seems accurate…

(Via BuzzFeed Books)
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notinmybelly:

gritsinmisery:

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kenyatta:

nypl:

We love our new book train. It’s helping to quickly transport materials from the stacks beneath the Stephen A. Schwarzman upstairs to the researchers who need them!

this is the highest quality #books content i’ve seen all season.

omg look at those hard working little cuties

I have always wanted pneumatic tubes in my home, and now I want this book train, too, even though I suspect the cats would spend all day riding it.

…and I would spend all day watching it instead of getting things done.

Oh my gosh. Oh my gosh. This is the greatest invention.
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levi-in-wonderland:

GATHER ‘ROUND CHILDREN AND LET ME TELL YOU A THING OR TWO ABOUT THIS GLORIOUS BOOK.

I HAVE OWNED THIS BOOK FOR A WHILE BUT NOW I’M SHARING IT WITH TUMBLR BECAUSE WE’RE ALL DRAGON-LOVING-FUCKS. 

IN THIS BOOK

IN THIS MOTHERFUCKIN MASTER PIECE OF A BOOK

THE GIRL SEEKS OUT THE DRAGON BECAUSE SHE WANTS TO ESCAPE HER BORING LIFE AS A PRINCESS.

I DON’T THINK YOU GUYS HEARD ME. 

THE GIRL WANTS TO BE WITH THE DRAGON.

AND THIS AINT EVEN IN A ROMANTIC WAY. SHE JUST RESPECTS THE DRAGON SO FUCKING MUCH. 

THERE IS EVEN A PART WHERE SHE REPEATEDLY TELLS A PRINCE TO STOP TRYING TO SAVE HER BECAUSE SHE WANTS TO BE THERE AND THE PRINCE JUST ISN’T GETTING IT BECAUSE HE’S NEVER HEARD OF A PRINCESS WANTING TO BE AMONG DRAGONS BEFORE. 

LIKE I CAN’T EVEN RIGHT NOW JUST READ THE DAMN THING. 

THIS IS THE MOST READ BOOK I OWN AND I READ A LOT OF BOOKS AND HAVE MANY FAVORITES SO Y'ALL KNOW THIS BOOK MUST BE GOOD. 

i have read it a total of 39749823792837493 times. 

@sibilant-bliss :D

Every once in a while a post comes around that reminds me of how important these books were to wee me, and I have to reblog it so that other people can find this very important series.

Bonus: the dragon she goes to live with, Kazul, is also female. Through various events in the book, Kazul eventually becomes King of the Dragons (yes, you read that right–in dragon culture, the titles of King and Queen are not tied to gender.

I cannot TELL YOU how much little Stele wanted to run away and become a dragon’s princess.

I LOVED this series growing up. now I want to re read it…

I was wondering when someone was going to say it. D: 

THESE BOOKS ARE THE FUCKING BEST OKAY

also the books are just fucking hilarious in general like the entire series is an exercise in dry humor and litotes

OMFG THESE FUCKING BOOKS OKAY.

I was about ten when I first picked this up, so I didn’t know much about
all the nastiness that happens to fantasy ladies, but I DID know there
were way too many princes and shepherd boys and woodcutters and sailors
and such having all the fun. By the time I was done, I was like, “Mom, pack my bags, I’m going to live with a dragon and be friends with a witch.” (The spit-take was epic.)

Cimorene was the fucking REASON I got into reading fantasy novels. It was so refreshing to see a strong female lead who didn’t get dumbed down or “humbled” (we all know what it means, fuck you GRRM) somewhere along the way. Cimorene was strong, she was sassy, she was smart, she was independent, and she was still GIRLY. And she didn’t need to fiddle-fart around with special powers or magical ancestral relics to kick wizard ass, oh no. CLEANING SUPPLIES.

And don’t even get me started on Morwen and how much that influenced my interest in magic.

Dealing With Dragons led to The Ruins of Ambrai, which led to The Dragonstar books, which led to The Abhorsen Chronicles, which led to The Black Jewels series…

STRONG FEMALE FANTASY LEADS ARE IMPORTANT.

*gasp* no one has posted the absolutely AMAZING Trina Schart Hyman cover for this book, though! 

look at her amazing eyebrows, her sword, her attitude! I checked this book and its sequels out of the library so many times I might have set a record. 

Ah, god, these books are the best. And they were something of a bonding experience for myself and my mom when I was 16; I read through the entire series out loud to her over the course of a couple months. (We didn’t intend to start; I was rereading the series yet again and wanted to share the great opening lines, and just didn’t stop!)

These books are the fantasy series both of us wanted when we were kids, with characters that felt infinitely more real and relatable than yet another farmer’s son inevitably thrown into a hero role. It turns all the princess tropes on their ear and laughs at them for being so shallow (it does not laugh at shallow PRINCESSES however, and that distinction is SO important). The female characters support and help each other in their own way – even the ones the tropes suggest would be a hinderance or antagonistic – and this is the one series I recommend to all my friends who have kids.

It’s so nice to see these pristine cover images, because all of mine look like this:

OH MAAAN. I loved these books. I got them out of the library. I think I actually accidentally read the last one (about Cimorene’s son) first and then went back and read her books. The last one is actually still my favorite but they’re all so great.

THESE BOOKS ARE AMAZING and also hilariously your reading order was actually the order they were written in - Talking To Dragons was published first in like 1980 something and then the other three were written later in the 90s. I absolutely loved them too; Cimorene always struck me as the kind of hero that you’d actually want to be, rather than the hero that the book tells you is good or admirable. She’s smart and she likes cooking and she finds satisfaction in organizing things and she loves to learn and she’s brave and she fights against cruelty and cares for people and ugh, Cimorene is just great.

And where the FUCK is my $100 million blockbuster adaptation of this btw???
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grangerandherbooks:

I have always loved mythological creatures, but I think too many YA paranormal books focus on four creatures: vampires, werewolves, angels and fairies. So with the help of my followers (really they did all the work, I just wrote down the books into categories), I have compilied a list of books with underrated mythological creatures. Just to clarify, I haven’t read most of these books.

So if you like:

Mermaids:

Sea Change by Aimee Friedman

Siren by Tricia Rayburn

Fathomless by Jackson Pearce

Forgive My Fins by Tera Lynn Childs

Of Poseidon by Anna Banks

Teeth by Hannah Moskowitz

Ingo by Helen Dunmore

Sirena by Donna Jo Napoli

Ascension by Kara Dalkey

Deep Blue by Jennifer Donnelly

Lost Voices by Sarah Porter

Wake by Amanda Hocking  

The Tail of Emily Windsnap by Liz Kessler

Tangled Tides by Karen Amanda Hooper

Tempest Rising by Tracey Deebs

Lies Beneath series by Anne Greenwood

The Siren by Kiers Cass

Daughters of the Sea by Kathryn Lasky

Ghosts:

Anna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake

A Wounded Name by Dot Hutchison (A retelling of Hamlet)

Shades of London by Maureen Johnson

The Riddles of Epsilon by Christine Morton-Shaw

The Hollow by Jessica Verday

Shade by Jeri Smith Ready

Hereafter by Tara Hudson

Ruined by Paula Morris

Necromancers:

The Darkest Powers trilogy by Kelley Armstrong

Sabriel, Lirael, and Abhorsen (a trilogy) by Garth Nix

Hold Me Closer, Necromancer by Lish McBride

The Johannes Cabal series by Jonathan L. Howard 

Demons:

Hex Hall by Rachel Hawkins

Personal Demonsby Lisa Desrochers

Demon Lexicon series by Sarah Rees Brennan

Banshee:

My Soul To Take by Rachel Vincent

Sidhe’s Call by Christy G. Thomas 

The Banshee Initiate by Kelly Matsuura

Goblins:

Runemarks by Joanne Harris

The Goblin Wood by Hilari Bell

The Hollow Kingdom by Clare B. Dunkle

Monsters:

The Monstrumologist series by Rick Yancey

Pretty Monsters by Kelly Link

Dragons:

Eon by Alison Goodman

The Dragon of Trelian by Michelle Knudsen 

Enchanted Forrest series by Patricia C. Wrede

Soul Colector:

The Collector by Victoria Scott

Water horses:

The Scorpio Races by Maggie Stiefvater

Pooka:

Other by Karen Kincy

Dracons:

Firelightby Sophie Jordan

Talon by Julie Kagawa

Unicorns:

Rampant by Diana Peterfreund

Greek mythology:

Oh. My. Gods. by Tera Lynn Childs

Pegasus by Robin McKinley

Antigoddess by Kendare Blake

The Devil:

Between the Devil & the Deep Blue Sea by April Genevieve Tucholke

Different creatures:

Darkness Becomes Her by Kelly Keaton

Enchanted Ivy by Sarah Beth Durst

Paranormalcy by Kiersten White

The Replacement by Brenna Yovanoff

Beautiful Decay by Sylvia Lewis

Egyptian mythology:

The Chaos of Stars by Kiersten White

Chimaera:

Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor

Djinn:

The Amulet of Samarkand by Jonathan Stroud

Skin-walkers:

The Darkness Rising trilogy by Kelley Armstrong

Trickster gods and demons:

Cruel Beauty by Rosamund Hodge (A retelling of Beauty and the Beast)

Original mythology:

Books of Great Alta series by Jane Yolen

Genies:

As You Wish by Jackson Pearce

Selkies:

Seven Tears into the Sea by Terri Farley

Half Human by Bruce Coville

Reapers:

The Madison Avery series by Kim Harrison

Polynesian mythology:

Wildefire by Karsten Knight

Nightmare:

The Nightmare Affair  by Mindee Arnett
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hamelin-born:

One of the (many) book series I love to distraction is Barbara Hambly’s Those Who Hunt the Night series. However, it seems that very few people have even *heard* of it before. Which makes it - kind of hard to discuss with people…

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