Sep. 17th, 2017

rakasha: (Default)
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counterpunches:

morepopcornplease:

captainevans:

a little louder for the people of @marvelentertainment please.

best paragraph:

Secret Empire is the second worst selling event comic in Marvel’s history. Furthermore, it failed to bolster sales of its tie-in issues — series launched out of Secret Empire, such as Secret Warriors, were already hovering around the cancellation line just a couple of issues in. Marvel has spent a lot of time and money on this event, and has come out of the other side with lower sales and lower confidence from readers and retailers alike.

#serves them fuckin RIGHT

@lectorel
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dunnomann:

POISED, INSPIRATIONAL, UNAFRAID

VOTE FOR CENTRAL CITY’S REAL HERO

@robininthelabyrinth
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the-noldorin:

mirkwood elves aesthetic

“The feasting people were Wood-elves, of course. These are not wicked folk. If they have a fault it is distrust of strangers. Though their magic was strong, even in those days they were wary. They differed from the High Elves of the West, and were more dangerous and less wise.”
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aconitvms:

orikomi:

queensimia:

rewritethis-story:

santagivemeapony:

queenofsabah:

askragtatter:

discoverynews:

micdotcom:

Do this four times repeatedly and you’ll be out. But how does it work? There’s some real brain science behind it.

We’re trying this tonight!

It’s about time someone got around to uncovering all the cheat codes for this “human being” software. It’s only been out for like 10,000 years.

?????????????

I’ve used this technique for about a year, and I can safely say that it has efficiently transformed my sleeping habits from several hours of struggle to fall asleep, to passing out in a matter of minutes.

It’s a form of Alexander Technique. It’s a technique that was designed for actors to keep their body in ready working condition and give it the best way to perform. This is the method used to calm, and center the body. Once the body is at that point it can perform anything you want it to.

Reblogging for later reference after I tried it earlier today to try to calm down. It actually does help a lot, not just for sleep but if you have problems with anxiety.

My default mental setting is “vibrating intensely in the background.” After doing this, I felt noticeably calm and relaxed - I wasn’t as fixated on my breathing, I wasn’t tense, my movements weren’t jerky and I didn’t feel like I had to be as tense as possible to be under control. 10/10 would recommend.

me gonna try it

dont wanna reblog but insomnia is a bitch for some ppl so heres for my mutuals having trouble sleeping.
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Today has been a good day. I have managed to get my hands on not only The Book of Lost Tales but also Morgoth’s Ring. Specifically, the section entitled ‘Of the Laws and Customs Among the Eldar’. Which has sparked various thoughts regarding mine and @elenothar​ ‘s ongoing Lord of the Rings/Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them worldbuild. See below for some of my musings!

Canonically, Eluréd and Elurín were six or seven years old when the Second Kinslaying descended upon Dorianth. However, it is also canonical that elvish children mature at a vastly slower rate then do humans; assuming that the twin followed elvish developmental patterns (they did have human ancestry), they might have had the physical appearance of three to four year old children. Little more then toddlers. That - really puts it into perspective. Tolkien also states that Eldar mentally mature at a much faster rate then do humans, but trauma and mental and physical shock could have induced psychogenic amnesia. (My knowledge of psychogenic amnesia is strictly obtained from wiki, so there is every possibility that I might be wrong).

Newt and Theseus would have been children. They might have seen their parents die; they would have been taken from all that was familiar and driven into the wilderness to die of cold and hunger. They would have had nothing left but each other - Graves tries not to think about it. Newt and Theseus have spent literally years trying not to think about it; their earliest recollections - of fear and hunger and darkness - are not particularly pleasant ones. The twins have - mixed feelings about their lack of memories of what transpired before. Prior to the revelation of their heritage, the temptation of knowing their true backgrounds was a factor - but. But even if it had been a possibility, they weren’t sure if they wanted to know who they were before the gap in their memories. The twins had foster-parents that they loved among both humans and the avari; they know who they are. They like who they are. 

Despite it not being strictly necessary, apparently there are uniquely elvish wedding traditions. …Newt, for one, wouldn’t care about a traditional ceremony. Percival, on the other hand - well, he might not particularly mind either (Graves is practical; it’s one of his defining characteristics) but he might also feel that Newt deserves every courtesy and honor that he can bestow. Namely, a year-long betrothal, as jointly agreed upon/announced by the families of the spouses-to-be, and the exchange of silver rings - which are later swapped for gold in the actual ceremony.

…Newt’s only known family (at that time) is Theseus; Graves, on the other hand, doesn’t have any blood kin remaining; however, the House of Elrond has always regarded him as both a longstanding ally and family in some vague, undefined way. (He’s been a constant of their respective childhoods, served and watched and guarded them all these years…) As such, Graves goes to the only member of Elrond’s family he admires for their practicality, fellow-feeling, and capability not to spread around the news that he’s getting married.

…which means that the marriage is formally agreed upon approved by Theseus and Arwen. The latter is delighted. The former somewhat less so. (His brother! His little brother is getting married! Newt politely asks one of the wolves-not-wargs-why-would-you-think-they’re-wargs? to sit on him until he calms down) Newt thinks this is all very silly, but it makes Percy happy, so why not? 

A marriage feast followed by the actual ceremony is also traditional; in this case, the ‘feast’ in question was a picnic in the middle of Mirkwood forest, and the ceremony was officiated by Radagast instead of the parents of the spouses - considering that none of said parents were actually living, and getting the knot tied by a Maia is definitely something. Apparently, it’s tradition among the Noldor for the parents to give their new offspring-in-law a ‘jewel upon a chain or collar’; Arwen, acting on Graves’ behalf, might give Newt a pretty necklace or something.

…of course, none of the above is strictly necessary considering that apparently it’s the wedding night that is the actual act of marriage, with everything else being ceremonial and not really needed. I’m choosing to believe that there’s some kind of mutual intent needed between the parties in question to forge said marriage. Or is casual sex just - not a thing among elves?

With regards to Gondolin - I wonder what House Graves belonged to? I’m tempted to say he was a guard/soldier in the House of the King, considering his canonical rank in MACUSA - the seat of power. Individuals in said house consisted of “the King’s family and bodyguard.“ Then again, he could be a member of the House of the Wing - “The bodyguard of Tuor, and the smallest house.” If Graves was a member of either House - that could also be one reason why he sticks close to the descendants of Turgon/Tuor (in addition to his sense of duty); they’re basically the only semi-family he has left.

…I’m actually pretty sure he was a member of the House of the Wing, seeing as how The Book of Lost Tales states that the member of the House of the King basically stayed with Turgon to the last and died alongside him. Also, there’s a pretty good likelihood that the House of the Wing might have had one of the highest survival rates of the various populations in Gondolin - considering how they basically followed Tuor, and how Tuor was the one who led the evacuation.

“Mighty was the array of the house of the king and their colors were white and gold and red, and their emblems the moon and the sun and the scarlet heart…” That’s the House of the King. The House of the Wing - “All these wore wings as it were of swans or gulls upon their helms, and the emblem of the White Wing was upon their shields.” I wonder if Graves has any physical remembrances - any tokens, or badges of office, or anything from that time?

Just - Graves. Graves, looking out over the walls of Gondolin during what was supposed to be a holiday, and seeing the plains teaming with dragons and fire-serpents, orcs and balrogs. Being there when the northern gate fell and the orcs poured into the city, killing everyone in their path. He saw the House of the Hammer of Wrath die to a man; he might even have seen Ecthelion slay Gothmog, Lord of Balrogs. He ran with the rest of the survivors across the plains, in that last desperate rush - and there’s a strong likelihood that he witnessed Glorfindel’s last stand.

Also - @elenothar​ , remember how we talked about just how many elves survived the Fall of Gondolin? The Book of Lost Tales says that 580 survived to resettle at the Mouths of Sirion. I looked up some speculation online - apparently, Gondolin was able to field an army at least 10,000 strong in the Battle of Unnumbered Tears, meaning the city had - about 30,000 people, maybe?

…meaning about 2% of the population of Gondolin managed to escape.

…Graves can sympathize with Newt to a rather large extent regarding his spouse’s disinclination to listen or sing about his family. Graves was present at some of the events that elves love to sing about - the fall of Gondolin, the battles of Ecthelion and Glorfindel, the death of the House of the Hammer - they’re not good memories.
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… All I can think of is Elrond face-palming so hard. He did not ask for all these badgers to suddenly set up a perimeter around Rivendell, nor the deer to come warn them of orc activity, or bears lumbering out from the woods to surprise an orc hunting party. The birds become even chattier than normal.

Whenever Newt is in the vicinity he acquires an entourage. Graves gets used to it eventually. (But not before nearly jumping out of his skin when Newt shows up with a wolf in tow one day. Misunderstood creatures. Right.)
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imaginarykangaroohorns:

francesvhale:

lordticklefish:

23devil:

ultrafacts:

Source: 1 2 If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

marriage is fucked up

Evil Spirit: FUCK, THERE’S 8 WOMEN ALL WEARING THE SAME COLORED DRESS AND ONE IN WHITE, FUCKING WHICH ONE IS THE DAMN BRIDE?! DAMN IT, FUCK THIS SHIT I’M OUT OF HERE

actually originally the bride and all the bridesmaids wore the exact same dress and veiled their faces heavily. Which one was exactly the bride wasn’t revealed until the very last minute.

I love this so much
Groom’s bff: bro id die for u and ur wife
Bride’s bff: lets confuse the fuck out of these spirits
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mamin-the-troll:

Mini!Newt in Niffler’s pouch from @allforthegreatergood‘s Pocket-size AU fic

The AU is so damn cute I can’t stop myself *screams*

@funkzpiel
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So you’re positing that an elf would either have had to see the light of the trees or have strong Maia blood in them to do it? I don’t think there’s any evidence that Dior or any of the other descendants of Melian can do it, though I suppose they might just be a bit more subtle about it. Honestly, I think if Newt and theseus could do it it would’ve come out a lot earlier that they are the lost princes.
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Hmm. If they ever saw a Silmaril, I think the memory would’ve stuck. The Silmaril are literally The most magical objects, their light enchants etc. Maybe Newt and Theseus do remember a bright, beautiful light, but memory is fickle and they have no idea that it’s a Silmaril they remember.
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thebrigadier:

captbuccaneer:

— say your prayers now || m.a.w

#legit though this gifset perfectly sums up why she’s my fave #she’s such an unusual character #she’s definitely one of the ‘good guys’ #but she’s also unapologetically ambitious #utterly ruthless #uncompromising#never pointlessly cruel but 100% willing to hurt and kill people to achieve her ends #but she’s also incredibly loyal and fair to the men under her command and has their absolute trust and respect #and she would give her life to protect the innocent people of her country without a second thought #she’s a very complicated character who *seems* very simple at first glance #she’s a good person…but she’s not a nice person #at all (via enigmaticagentalice)
rakasha: (Default)
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scissorbritches:

megphail:

jaclcfrost:

vampires getting the urge to be intimate w/ their partners while feeding is so fucking funny to me… like imagine you’re just sitting there eating soup but getting REALLY into it? you just. want to fuck, b/c of the soup. want to fuck the soup

kinkshaming vampires

@funkzpiel
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elenothar:

hamelin-born:

Today has been a good day. I have managed to get my hands on not only The Book of Lost Tales but also Morgoth’s Ring. Specifically, the section entitled ‘Of the Laws and Customs Among the Eldar’. Which has sparked various thoughts regarding mine and @elenothar​ ‘s ongoing Lord of the Rings/Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them worldbuild. See below for some of my musings!

Canonically, Eluréd and Elurín were six or seven years old when the Second Kinslaying descended upon Dorianth. However, it is also canonical that elvish children mature at a vastly slower rate then do humans; assuming that the twin followed elvish developmental patterns (they did have human ancestry), they might have had the physical appearance of three to four year old children. Little more then toddlers. That - really puts it into perspective. Tolkien also states that Eldar mentally mature at a much faster rate then do humans, but trauma and mental and physical shock could have induced psychogenic amnesia. (My knowledge of psychogenic amnesia is strictly obtained from wiki, so there is every possibility that I might be wrong).

Newt and Theseus would have been children. They might have seen their parents die; they would have been taken from all that was familiar and driven into the wilderness to die of cold and hunger. They would have had nothing left but each other - Graves tries not to think about it. Newt and Theseus have spent literally years trying not to think about it; their earliest recollections - of fear and hunger and darkness - are not particularly pleasant ones. The twins have - mixed feelings about their lack of memories of what transpired before. Prior to the revelation of their heritage, the temptation of knowing their true backgrounds was a factor - but. But even if it had been a possibility, they weren’t sure if they wanted to know who they were before the gap in their memories. The twins had foster-parents that they loved among both humans and the avari; they know who they are. They like who they are. 

Despite it not being strictly necessary, apparently there are uniquely elvish wedding traditions. …Newt, for one, wouldn’t care about a traditional ceremony. Percival, on the other hand - well, he might not particularly mind either (Graves is practical; it’s one of his defining characteristics) but he might also feel that Newt deserves every courtesy and honor that he can bestow. Namely, a year-long betrothal, as jointly agreed upon/announced by the families of the spouses-to-be, and the exchange of silver rings - which are later swapped for gold in the actual ceremony.

…Newt’s only known family (at that time) is Theseus; Graves, on the other hand, doesn’t have any blood kin remaining; however, the House of Elrond has always regarded him as both a longstanding ally and family in some vague, undefined way. (He’s been a constant of their respective childhoods, served and watched and guarded them all these years…) As such, Graves goes to the only member of Elrond’s family he admires for their practicality, fellow-feeling, and capability not to spread around the news that he’s getting married.

…which means that the marriage is formally agreed upon approved by Theseus and Arwen. The latter is delighted. The former somewhat less so. (His brother! His little brother is getting married! Newt politely asks one of the wolves-not-wargs-why-would-you-think-they’re-wargs? to sit on him until he calms down) Newt thinks this is all very silly, but it makes Percy happy, so why not? 

A marriage feast followed by the actual ceremony is also traditional; in this case, the ‘feast’ in question was a picnic in the middle of Mirkwood forest, and the ceremony was officiated by Radagast instead of the parents of the spouses - considering that none of said parents were actually living, and getting the knot tied by a Maia is definitely something. Apparently, it’s tradition among the Noldor for the parents to give their new offspring-in-law a ‘jewel upon a chain or collar’; Arwen, acting on Graves’ behalf, might give Newt a pretty necklace or something.

…of course, none of the above is strictly necessary considering that apparently it’s the wedding night that is the actual act of marriage, with everything else being ceremonial and not really needed. I’m choosing to believe that there’s some kind of mutual intent needed between the parties in question to forge said marriage. Or is casual sex just - not a thing among elves?

With regards to Gondolin - I wonder what House Graves belonged to? I’m tempted to say he was a guard/soldier in the House of the King, considering his canonical rank in MACUSA - the seat of power. Individuals in said house consisted of “the King’s family and bodyguard.“ Then again, he could be a member of the House of the Wing - “The bodyguard of Tuor, and the smallest house.” If Graves was a member of either House - that could also be one reason why he sticks close to the descendants of Turgon/Tuor (in addition to his sense of duty); they’re basically the only semi-family he has left.

…I’m actually pretty sure he was a member of the House of the Wing, seeing as how The Book of Lost Tales states that the member of the House of the King basically stayed with Turgon to the last and died alongside him. Also, there’s a pretty good likelihood that the House of the Wing might have had one of the highest survival rates of the various populations in Gondolin - considering how they basically followed Tuor, and how Tuor was the one who led the evacuation.

“Mighty was the array of the house of the king and their colors were white and gold and red, and their emblems the moon and the sun and the scarlet heart…” That’s the House of the King. The House of the Wing - “All these wore wings as it were of swans or gulls upon their helms, and the emblem of the White Wing was upon their shields.” I wonder if Graves has any physical remembrances - any tokens, or badges of office, or anything from that time?

Just - Graves. Graves, looking out over the walls of Gondolin during what was supposed to be a holiday, and seeing the plains teaming with dragons and fire-serpents, orcs and balrogs. Being there when the northern gate fell and the orcs poured into the city, killing everyone in their path. He saw the House of the Hammer of Wrath die to a man; he might even have seen Ecthelion slay Gothmog, Lord of Balrogs. He ran with the rest of the survivors across the plains, in that last desperate rush - and there’s a strong likelihood that he witnessed Glorfindel’s last stand.

Also - @elenothar​ , remember how we talked about just how many elves survived the Fall of Gondolin? The Book of Lost Tales says that 580 survived to resettle at the Mouths of Sirion. I looked up some speculation online - apparently, Gondolin was able to field an army at least 10,000 strong in the Battle of Unnumbered Tears, meaning the city had - about 30,000 people, maybe?

…meaning about 2% of the population of Gondolin managed to escape.

…Graves can sympathize with Newt to a rather large extent regarding his spouse’s disinclination to listen or sing about his family. Graves was present at some of the events that elves love to sing about - the fall of Gondolin, the battles of Ecthelion and Glorfindel, the death of the House of the Hammer - they’re not good memories.

I’m so here for the idea of Graves being sort of unofficially adopted by the House of Elrond. Arwen is delighted when he asks her about standing with him at the wedding - she knows Graves well enough to realise what a huge show of trust that is. (Elladan and Elrohir are definitely not going to hear the news from her, though it’s inescapable that they’ll eventually find out and start the teasing.) Newt, though he usually finds jewelry impractical, always wears the small chain that Arwen gives him on behalf of Graves. It’s in the shape of a wing because of Graves’ house. Graves as part of the House of the Wing actually makes a lot of sense to me - plus I really like the assocation of him with birds (you know, some kind of proud bird of prey?). I think he may wear a discrete wing embroidered on his cloak, maybe, but generally he doesn’t advertise who he is and where he comes from. But he can’t bear to be entirely without reminders - he not only feels he owes Gondolin and all his fallen kin that much, but it’s also a part of him.

… Oh man, do you think he might have some ridiculous helmet with wings stashed away somewhere? He never wears it, of course, didn’t even like wearing it back in Gondolin unless it was an official function and he had to. Tuor probably teased him about that. Given that Tuor only arrived in Gondolin fairly close to its end, maybe Graves was a high-ranking guard and member of the House of Kings before his arrival and Turgon assigned him to Tuor and the newly formed House of the Wing as a sign of his favour and trust in his new son in law? After all, his daughter’s husband should have the best security bar the king’s. Or did the House of the Wing already exist and just shifted its responsibilities to Tuor?

I didn’t even think of the fact that Graves would know Glorfindel (have seen him die) before now. Maybe that’s part of the reason he’s drawn to Rivendell? Actually, wouldn’t Glorfindel be a good choice to come to the wedding as well? He’s not kin, but he is one of the very few survivors of Gondolin that Graves knows about who hasn’t returned across the sea. 

2%. Jfc. Sometimes I forget that all of the Silmarillion is pain.

Graves has been a longstanding ally of Elrond’s family since before Elrond himself was born; he served Turgon, Elrond’s great-grandfather, Tuor, Elrond’s grandfather, Eärendil, Elrond’s father -  who himself probably regarded him as a close friend and surrogate uncle. Graves is loyal - and he’s been a constant in Elrond’s household for a very long time. Tuor probably released his men of all obligation to him and his House a long, long time ago - but Graves still stayed. I’d imagine that there’s little that Graves would ask that the house of Elrond would not willingly give him. Which might be one reason they were so worried when he started to go on longer and longer trips in the wilderness, looking for a fight, for a challenge, for something. And it’s also another reason that Arwen would be honored and delighted to help the elf who had given everything for her family and never asked for a thing in return.

…of course, it turns out that Graves really is family when the truth of his husband’s background becomes known. He’s literal Elrond’s uncle-in-law now - Arwen and the Twins probably start calling him that immediately.

I was under the impression that the emblem of the House of the Wing was more along the lines of a swan-wing, but a bird of prey sounds - quite suitable for Graves. I also now have the sudden mental image of Graves having a cloak shaped like a pair of folded wings that he keeps stuffed in the very back of his closet. It can keep company with that ridiculous winged helmet - which he hates, but can’t bring himself to throw away. Considering that Morgoth’s forces attacked on a holiday - a day when everyone would be dressed in their most ornate, ceremonial wear - there’s a high likelihood that said helmet is the one that he wore during the Fall of Gondolin and carried to the Mouths of Sirion.

…perhaps the fact that said attack took place during that time meant that Graves was lucky (?) enough to be carrying/wearing the more formal heirlooms of his family, meaning that they weren’t lost when the City fell. He was probably shocked when Orcrist and Glamdring turned up again; he never thought he’d see those again in his lifetime. Also, didn’t we speculate that his own sword was - nothing spectacular or out of legend, but a good sword that’s been with him through many battles - and yes, it glows blue in the presence of orcs.

I like the headcanon that Graves transferred from the House of the King to the House of the Wing! I don’t know much about the size of the latter, except that it’s mentioned to be the smallest of all the houses. Google-fu doesn’t provide any answers on that front either, but - well. Tuor led them (except for the guards he left with his wife and child) through the thick of the fight; I wouldn’t be surprised if they sustained heavy casualties. I also wonder just how many survivors of lost Gondolin remained in Middle Earth during the time period of The Lord of the Rings? The Havens, where most of them ended up at, were destroyed by the Feanorians; I don’t - think many survived. Honestly, I’m surprised that more of them didn’t seek the Sea when the option was presented to them. As it is - Graves lost his city, what remained of his family, and most of the people that he knew during the Fall of Gondolin, and he’s had to sit and watch as war, sorrow, and time whittled away the few survivors. I wouldn’t be surprised if he’s one of the few members of the House of the Wing - maybe the last member - on this side of the Sea.

Graves and Newt probably keep their wedding/betrothal quiet - not because they care about what other people think of them, but because it simply isn’t in either of their natures to make a production out of it. And it really, really isn’t anyone else’s business. Although once the Noldor custom of providing necklaces as a gift is explained to the Scamanders… well. I now have the mental image of Theseus showing up sometime after the wedding and handing Percival a necklace, apologizing that it took him so long - he wasn’t aware of the custom before Arwen explained it to him, and it took him a while to save up for something nice. Theseus actually commissioned it from the Dwarves - it’s a silver warg’s tooth, or something along those lines, and might also make for a weapon of last resort. 

Apparently Thingol’s emblem - which might be the one the Scamanders could claim by right by right of descent (they wouldn’t. They actually literally run away whenever anyone suggests as much - although I wouldn’t be surprised if Graves’ winged cloak and helmet share the space in the back of the wardrobe with a cloak emblazoned with said heraldry) - was a “winged moon on black surrounded by stars”. Odd coincidence.

I don’t think Glorfindel and Graves are particularly close - they knew one another in Goldolin by sight, but they never really talked or moved in the same circles. In Rivendell, they’re on a more equal level, and help coordinate the defense of the valley - and, rarely, they might sometimes just sit and remember. But they’re still not friends, or at least not close enough that Graves would invite him to his wedding - either that, or he simply didn’t trust the ex-Head of the House of the Golden Flower not to keep his mouth shut.
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caledoniaseries:

People who have never seen Lake Superior do not often understand how deadly and terrifying it can be. I’ve been asked many times if there is a monster legend associated with the lake, because I am an American highway legend specialist and Scottish folklorist.

There are a few legends associate with the lake. For example, there is an old Anishinaabe legend that there is a sturgeon in Lake Superior that can swallow an entire city. 

However, when I have been asked this question, I often respond:

The lake is the monster.

There are old sailor’s superstitions still current among sailors and residents of the towns around the lake. I learned many of them while working on the water one summer and gaining a newfound respect for Lake Superior’s incredible power. There is a sense among the people there that the lake itself is sentient.

One example of the lake’s power is a phenomenon called The Three Sisters. This is when three rogue waves form and wash across a ship so quickly that the water does not have time to clear the decks. Many shipwrecks have been caused by The Three Sisters, most notably the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald. The ship was found at the bottom of the lake split in half, and it is thought that The Three Sisters were responsible for its sinking.

source: http://ift.tt/2svoYwS

Lake Superior is also so cold that it doesn’t allow the bacterial growth necessary for dead bodies to rise to the surface. The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead, as the old legend goes. There are many shipwrecks where the bodies are still there, almost perfectly intact despite having been down there for years.

The lake is a force of nature on its own, and as one explorer said, the most dangerous piece of water in the world.

The lake is the monster.

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