rakasha: (Default)
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themoonlily:

ohlurr:

I realize this is not new information to anyone, but what struck me so hard this time I read the Lord of the Rings was the sense of melancholy.  Like it’s painfully obvious to the reader that this world is Not As It Once Was.  All of the characters we meet reference this feeling of loss in one way or another.  

The elves are the most obvious - with their fading light and their ships sailing away.  Treebeard talks about how the woods aren’t as they once were, about the ents who are falling asleep and withering to nothing.  The dwarves lust after the glory of their forefathers, be it in mountain fortresses or caverns of mithril - now empty and echoing.  Old Tom Bombadil remembers a race of great men and women, reduced simply to trinkets in cold tombs.

And even men, the race set to inherit this new age, even they are experiencing this sense of melancholy, of losing hold of something great.  We see their great cities reduced to rubble on riverbanks, or possessed by evil.  Aragorn longs to return to his throne to restore the glory of ages past, to somehow rejuvenate that which is dying in the race of men. 

And hobbits?  At first we see them as living in the present, with no great glory of the past to tie them down.  Yet when Frodo returns to the Shire, it is…Not As It Once Was.  And I think while the other hobbits are able to shake off this feeling and return to their love of life and the present, maybe Frodo’s true burden is to inherit this sense of loss from the rest of Middle Earth.  

And what makes Lord of the Rings (and Tolkien) so extraordinary, at least to me, is how there is still so much hope in the story even with all its sadness. Hope is literally Aragorn’s childhood name, given to him at a time his House is all but finished. Hope is what drives Gandalf and leads his way when others of his order become distracted and give up their purpose. Hope appears to Sam when he and Frodo trudge towards what seems to be their end in the fires of Mount Doom. Hope is there at dawn when Rohirrim arrive at Minas Tirith and blow their horns, and they ride to defend the City of Kings, though they know what they are facing. In fact, for me some of the most brilliant moments in the story are those when hope appears in the middle of darkest despair. Tolkien writes like sadness and hope are merely the two sides of the same coin. 

One of the many things I love about the world Tolkien created is the exquisite beauty that rises from sadness; lesser stories would transform sorrow and grief into bitterness, but in Tolkien’s world, it becomes a force for pity and wisdom and love. Some of his best and wisest characters are those who have known great sorrow. Melancholy and sadness are a part of Arda Marred, but like Gandalf says: “not all tears are an evil.” 

Perhaps my favourite quote from Tolkien is Haldir’s line from the Fellowship of the Ring, when the company is nearing Lothlórien:

“The world is indeed full of peril, and in it there are many dark places; but still there is much that is fair, and though in all lands love is now mingled with grief, it grows perhaps the greater.”
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holy HECK ems…! This is so perfect, this is amazing. 

I need this. I need Ole Gammer Greenhand and her big happy lollopy puddle of a warg doggo, Heather. 

With his big sad eyes whenever she is cooking, so that he gets the scraps. “Bottomless pit… all right, here you are. I spoil you rotten, y’know that?”

 And his tendency to try and curl up on her tiny lap, even though he can only fit his head and maaaaaaybe his front paws on there. “Ooof! Oh, you big goof. All right, who wants an ear-scratch? Whosagoodboy? Whoosagooboyden! YOU ARE!”

And his goofy, tongue-lolling grin after he has done a good job chasing the birds off the seedlings. “That’s a lad! Good boy, Heather.”

And oh yes FINE, sure - and his teeth that can crack an ox’s thighbone in one bite. “Oh, that’s just the dog, that crunching noise - pay it no mind me dears.”

and the ranger sees him and stares.

And Gammer Greenhand notices where the ranger is looking, and waves a tiny, wrinkled hand. “That’s just Heather, the great lummox. He’s a big soft lump, but I keep him for the company, you know? It’s nice t’ have someone to talk to, at my age.”
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harrypotterconfessions:

Whenever a character in Harry Potter makes a really dumb mistake, I think of Treebeard from Lord of the Rings saying, “A wizard should know better!”
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anotherscreamingfangirl:

roadhonk:

this is what a hobbit would mug you with

not idly do the leaves of lorien cut a bitch
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elenothar:

hamelin-born:

elenothar:

hamelin-born:

Today has been a good day. I have managed to get my hands on not only The Book of Lost Tales but also Morgoth’s Ring. Specifically, the section entitled ‘Of the Laws and Customs Among the Eldar’. Which has sparked various thoughts regarding mine and @elenothar​ ‘s ongoing Lord of the Rings/Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them worldbuild. See below for some of my musings!

Canonically, Eluréd and Elurín were six or seven years old when the Second Kinslaying descended upon Dorianth. However, it is also canonical that elvish children mature at a vastly slower rate then do humans; assuming that the twin followed elvish developmental patterns (they did have human ancestry), they might have had the physical appearance of three to four year old children. Little more then toddlers. That - really puts it into perspective. Tolkien also states that Eldar mentally mature at a much faster rate then do humans, but trauma and mental and physical shock could have induced psychogenic amnesia. (My knowledge of psychogenic amnesia is strictly obtained from wiki, so there is every possibility that I might be wrong).

Newt and Theseus would have been children. They might have seen their parents die; they would have been taken from all that was familiar and driven into the wilderness to die of cold and hunger. They would have had nothing left but each other - Graves tries not to think about it. Newt and Theseus have spent literally years trying not to think about it; their earliest recollections - of fear and hunger and darkness - are not particularly pleasant ones. The twins have - mixed feelings about their lack of memories of what transpired before. Prior to the revelation of their heritage, the temptation of knowing their true backgrounds was a factor - but. But even if it had been a possibility, they weren’t sure if they wanted to know who they were before the gap in their memories. The twins had foster-parents that they loved among both humans and the avari; they know who they are. They like who they are. 

Despite it not being strictly necessary, apparently there are uniquely elvish wedding traditions. …Newt, for one, wouldn’t care about a traditional ceremony. Percival, on the other hand - well, he might not particularly mind either (Graves is practical; it’s one of his defining characteristics) but he might also feel that Newt deserves every courtesy and honor that he can bestow. Namely, a year-long betrothal, as jointly agreed upon/announced by the families of the spouses-to-be, and the exchange of silver rings - which are later swapped for gold in the actual ceremony.

…Newt’s only known family (at that time) is Theseus; Graves, on the other hand, doesn’t have any blood kin remaining; however, the House of Elrond has always regarded him as both a longstanding ally and family in some vague, undefined way. (He’s been a constant of their respective childhoods, served and watched and guarded them all these years…) As such, Graves goes to the only member of Elrond’s family he admires for their practicality, fellow-feeling, and capability not to spread around the news that he’s getting married.

…which means that the marriage is formally agreed upon approved by Theseus and Arwen. The latter is delighted. The former somewhat less so. (His brother! His little brother is getting married! Newt politely asks one of the wolves-not-wargs-why-would-you-think-they’re-wargs? to sit on him until he calms down) Newt thinks this is all very silly, but it makes Percy happy, so why not? 

A marriage feast followed by the actual ceremony is also traditional; in this case, the ‘feast’ in question was a picnic in the middle of Mirkwood forest, and the ceremony was officiated by Radagast instead of the parents of the spouses - considering that none of said parents were actually living, and getting the knot tied by a Maia is definitely something. Apparently, it’s tradition among the Noldor for the parents to give their new offspring-in-law a ‘jewel upon a chain or collar’; Arwen, acting on Graves’ behalf, might give Newt a pretty necklace or something.

…of course, none of the above is strictly necessary considering that apparently it’s the wedding night that is the actual act of marriage, with everything else being ceremonial and not really needed. I’m choosing to believe that there’s some kind of mutual intent needed between the parties in question to forge said marriage. Or is casual sex just - not a thing among elves?

With regards to Gondolin - I wonder what House Graves belonged to? I’m tempted to say he was a guard/soldier in the House of the King, considering his canonical rank in MACUSA - the seat of power. Individuals in said house consisted of “the King’s family and bodyguard.“ Then again, he could be a member of the House of the Wing - “The bodyguard of Tuor, and the smallest house.” If Graves was a member of either House - that could also be one reason why he sticks close to the descendants of Turgon/Tuor (in addition to his sense of duty); they’re basically the only semi-family he has left.

…I’m actually pretty sure he was a member of the House of the Wing, seeing as how The Book of Lost Tales states that the member of the House of the King basically stayed with Turgon to the last and died alongside him. Also, there’s a pretty good likelihood that the House of the Wing might have had one of the highest survival rates of the various populations in Gondolin - considering how they basically followed Tuor, and how Tuor was the one who led the evacuation.

“Mighty was the array of the house of the king and their colors were white and gold and red, and their emblems the moon and the sun and the scarlet heart…” That’s the House of the King. The House of the Wing - “All these wore wings as it were of swans or gulls upon their helms, and the emblem of the White Wing was upon their shields.” I wonder if Graves has any physical remembrances - any tokens, or badges of office, or anything from that time?

Just - Graves. Graves, looking out over the walls of Gondolin during what was supposed to be a holiday, and seeing the plains teaming with dragons and fire-serpents, orcs and balrogs. Being there when the northern gate fell and the orcs poured into the city, killing everyone in their path. He saw the House of the Hammer of Wrath die to a man; he might even have seen Ecthelion slay Gothmog, Lord of Balrogs. He ran with the rest of the survivors across the plains, in that last desperate rush - and there’s a strong likelihood that he witnessed Glorfindel’s last stand.

Also - @elenothar​ , remember how we talked about just how many elves survived the Fall of Gondolin? The Book of Lost Tales says that 580 survived to resettle at the Mouths of Sirion. I looked up some speculation online - apparently, Gondolin was able to field an army at least 10,000 strong in the Battle of Unnumbered Tears, meaning the city had - about 30,000 people, maybe?

…meaning about 2% of the population of Gondolin managed to escape.

…Graves can sympathize with Newt to a rather large extent regarding his spouse’s disinclination to listen or sing about his family. Graves was present at some of the events that elves love to sing about - the fall of Gondolin, the battles of Ecthelion and Glorfindel, the death of the House of the Hammer - they’re not good memories.

I’m so here for the idea of Graves being sort of unofficially adopted by the House of Elrond. Arwen is delighted when he asks her about standing with him at the wedding - she knows Graves well enough to realise what a huge show of trust that is. (Elladan and Elrohir are definitely not going to hear the news from her, though it’s inescapable that they’ll eventually find out and start the teasing.) Newt, though he usually finds jewelry impractical, always wears the small chain that Arwen gives him on behalf of Graves. It’s in the shape of a wing because of Graves’ house. Graves as part of the House of the Wing actually makes a lot of sense to me - plus I really like the assocation of him with birds (you know, some kind of proud bird of prey?). I think he may wear a discrete wing embroidered on his cloak, maybe, but generally he doesn’t advertise who he is and where he comes from. But he can’t bear to be entirely without reminders - he not only feels he owes Gondolin and all his fallen kin that much, but it’s also a part of him.

… Oh man, do you think he might have some ridiculous helmet with wings stashed away somewhere? He never wears it, of course, didn’t even like wearing it back in Gondolin unless it was an official function and he had to. Tuor probably teased him about that. Given that Tuor only arrived in Gondolin fairly close to its end, maybe Graves was a high-ranking guard and member of the House of Kings before his arrival and Turgon assigned him to Tuor and the newly formed House of the Wing as a sign of his favour and trust in his new son in law? After all, his daughter’s husband should have the best security bar the king’s. Or did the House of the Wing already exist and just shifted its responsibilities to Tuor?

I didn’t even think of the fact that Graves would know Glorfindel (have seen him die) before now. Maybe that’s part of the reason he’s drawn to Rivendell? Actually, wouldn’t Glorfindel be a good choice to come to the wedding as well? He’s not kin, but he is one of the very few survivors of Gondolin that Graves knows about who hasn’t returned across the sea. 

2%. Jfc. Sometimes I forget that all of the Silmarillion is pain.

Graves has been a longstanding ally of Elrond’s family since before Elrond himself was born; he served Turgon, Elrond’s great-grandfather, Tuor, Elrond’s grandfather, Eärendil, Elrond’s father -  who himself probably regarded him as a close friend and surrogate uncle. Graves is loyal - and he’s been a constant in Elrond’s household for a very long time. Tuor probably released his men of all obligation to him and his House a long, long time ago - but Graves still stayed. I’d imagine that there’s little that Graves would ask that the house of Elrond would not willingly give him. Which might be one reason they were so worried when he started to go on longer and longer trips in the wilderness, looking for a fight, for a challenge, for something. And it’s also another reason that Arwen would be honored and delighted to help the elf who had given everything for her family and never asked for a thing in return.

…of course, it turns out that Graves really is family when the truth of his husband’s background becomes known. He’s literal Elrond’s uncle-in-law now - Arwen and the Twins probably start calling him that immediately.

I was under the impression that the emblem of the House of the Wing was more along the lines of a swan-wing, but a bird of prey sounds - quite suitable for Graves. I also now have the sudden mental image of Graves having a cloak shaped like a pair of folded wings that he keeps stuffed in the very back of his closet. It can keep company with that ridiculous winged helmet - which he hates, but can’t bring himself to throw away. Considering that Morgoth’s forces attacked on a holiday - a day when everyone would be dressed in their most ornate, ceremonial wear - there’s a high likelihood that said helmet is the one that he wore during the Fall of Gondolin and carried to the Mouths of Sirion.

…perhaps the fact that said attack took place during that time meant that Graves was lucky (?) enough to be carrying/wearing the more formal heirlooms of his family, meaning that they weren’t lost when the City fell. He was probably shocked when Orcrist and Glamdring turned up again; he never thought he’d see those again in his lifetime. Also, didn’t we speculate that his own sword was - nothing spectacular or out of legend, but a good sword that’s been with him through many battles - and yes, it glows blue in the presence of orcs.

I like the headcanon that Graves transferred from the House of the King to the House of the Wing! I don’t know much about the size of the latter, except that it’s mentioned to be the smallest of all the houses. Google-fu doesn’t provide any answers on that front either, but - well. Tuor led them (except for the guards he left with his wife and child) through the thick of the fight; I wouldn’t be surprised if they sustained heavy casualties. I also wonder just how many survivors of lost Gondolin remained in Middle Earth during the time period of The Lord of the Rings? The Havens, where most of them ended up at, were destroyed by the Feanorians; I don’t - think many survived. Honestly, I’m surprised that more of them didn’t seek the Sea when the option was presented to them. As it is - Graves lost his city, what remained of his family, and most of the people that he knew during the Fall of Gondolin, and he’s had to sit and watch as war, sorrow, and time whittled away the few survivors. I wouldn’t be surprised if he’s one of the few members of the House of the Wing - maybe the last member - on this side of the Sea.

Graves and Newt probably keep their wedding/betrothal quiet - not because they care about what other people think of them, but because it simply isn’t in either of their natures to make a production out of it. And it really, really isn’t anyone else’s business. Although once the Noldor custom of providing necklaces as a gift is explained to the Scamanders… well. I now have the mental image of Theseus showing up sometime after the wedding and handing Percival a necklace, apologizing that it took him so long - he wasn’t aware of the custom before Arwen explained it to him, and it took him a while to save up for something nice. Theseus actually commissioned it from the Dwarves - it’s a silver warg’s tooth, or something along those lines, and might also make for a weapon of last resort. 

Apparently Thingol’s emblem - which might be the one the Scamanders could claim by right by right of descent (they wouldn’t. They actually literally run away whenever anyone suggests as much - although I wouldn’t be surprised if Graves’ winged cloak and helmet share the space in the back of the wardrobe with a cloak emblazoned with said heraldry) - was a “winged moon on black surrounded by stars”. Odd coincidence.

I don’t think Glorfindel and Graves are particularly close - they knew one another in Goldolin by sight, but they never really talked or moved in the same circles. In Rivendell, they’re on a more equal level, and help coordinate the defense of the valley - and, rarely, they might sometimes just sit and remember. But they’re still not friends, or at least not close enough that Graves would invite him to his wedding - either that, or he simply didn’t trust the ex-Head of the House of the Golden Flower not to keep his mouth shut.

Uncle Graves does have a certain ring to it, doesn’t it? He probably stares blankly the first time Arwen calls him that, then scowls, even though he’s secretly quite pleased. He hasn’t had a family in a long time.

Oh, yes, The House of the Wing definitely has a swan wing, or possibly like an albatross or a gull, but absolutely everyone agrees that that fits Graves not at all. He ended up with a nickname almost immediately when he transferred to the House (something like keen Hawk, along those lines). I really like that image of a cloak in the shape of great wings - you can’t quite see it when it’s worn normally, just that it has a feather pattern, but when it flares it looks magnificent. If possibly a bit pretentious, or so Graves always thought. Wanna bet that Elladan and Elrohir go snooping in his room one day when they’re still young and impetuous and find the helmet and cloak?

Probably not a silver warg’s tooth because Newt wouldn’t like that so much and it’s not really Graves’ style either (unless Theseus is taking the mickey, but he wouldn’t do that for a wedding gift), though I agree that it’s likely to be something with a sharp edge *restraining myself from adding feather/wing imagery everywhere*
Of course the Scamander’s emblem is a winged moon. Of course. Though maybe Newt would rather claim a nightingale? Still got wings…

Glorfindel is notoriously bad at keeping his mouth shut and that hasn’t changed in the last few centuries. I think though they might not be close (they’re two very different personalities after all, though actually that might lend itself to friendship), there’s a solace in not being the only/last survivor of Gondolin around. Between them they can recreate the city and remember the good times, too, not only the dark that they both remember only too well. Graves is probably like ‘Glorfindel who?’ whenever he’s asked whether they knew each other. It’s partly facetious, but mostly that’s just a private thing between the two of them.

Just wait until Elrond calls him Uncle - dropping it into casual conversation, so that Graves is halfway through a response before his brain catches up to his ears. (The Twins had to get it from somewhere, and Percy does know what Elrond got up to as a child). Elrond - and the rest of his House - are ecstatic at gaining more family, especially Graves - who has been family in everything but name for literal Ages of the world.

The fallout from that incident still makes Elladan and Elohir shudder. Graves was not happy to find them snooping around in his personal possessions, let alone some of the very few relics he has of the place of his birth. He’s a very private person in some ways, and the twins snooping through his room, going through his things, violating his privacy… Graves came back from patrol to find Elladan posing as the helmet slipped down over his nose, and Elohir whooping with laughter as he flapped the cloak like wings.

Graves was not happy. The twins literally didn’t know he was there before hands closed around their shoulders and dragged them out of the room; they started to be genuinely afraid when they looked up and saw Graves’ expression shut down. The last of the House of the Wing dragged the two before their father, plunked them down, explained the situation to Elrond, and then - talked to the twins.

Graves was not strictly fair with them. After all, he too thought that the helmet was ridiculous, and he’d burn that cloak if he ever found a viable excuse. But he lambasted Elladan and Elohir until both elflings were tongue-tied and felt lower then pond scum - this wasn’t helped by Elrond’s grave expression, or the way he formally apologized to Percival afterwards. Or the way Graves wouldn’t accept an apology until they could tell him what they were apologizing for.

I’m being silly. Of course Theseus would give Graves a pendant in the shape of a silver salamander. Perhaps something like this http://ift.tt/2fove5K or http://ift.tt/2xzV90O .  I’m fairly sure it wouldn’t have a sharp edge, but Graves would treasure it. And I think that their grandmother’s (Luthien’s) crest was one of two flowers - Thingol’s crest isn’t exactly a thing that’s emblematic of his family as a whole. But I must agree, I like the idea of Newt and Theseus having a winged moon for a crest.

Graves has probably snapped at people before that Gondolin was a BIG city; just because two elves are from the same place doesn’t mean that they’re acquainted with one another. (Graves is, for the most part, being painfully truthful while not telling the truth at all. )
rakasha: (Default)
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queenerestor:

I always comfort myself with the fact that no matter how badly I mess up, I will never mess up as badly as literally every character in the Silmarillion

@greenekangaroo @urloth
rakasha: (Default)
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Hmm, so has he stuck close to Elrond ever since? Also, how did he take Elros deciding to be mortal and fucking off to Numenor? Because Graves, even AU elf Graves can carry grudges like no one else - he would’ve forgiven and understood Elros’ choice for the man’s own sake, but he saw (and kept seeing, every day, every year) the consequences that choice had on Elrond, who became a bit of a miserable, lonely bastard until he met Celebrian (and we all know how that ends…)
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the-tater:

Earlier today, recently-arrived prince and intrepid explorer Findekáno, well-known harpist and first son of current High King Ñolofinwë, unexpectedly returned to camp on the back of a giant eagle while carrying most of his cousin, also current High King Nelyafinwë Maitimo.

“I was wandering around the mountains near Thangorodrim, looking for a nice place to sit down and maybe hitch a ride with a passing Orc patrol, when suddenly this great shadow descended upon me and Thorondor showed up,”  Findekáno said earlier, pointing to the giant eagle he rode in on. “He even showed me where Cousin Russandol was, which was pretty nice.”

Findekáno, fifty-second place winner of the All-Valinor Archery Competition three hundred and fifty years in a row, had been last seen setting foot in Beleriand and was rumored to have run away to search for his missing cousin three weeks ago. High King Nelyafinwë Maitimo, colloquially known as “Cousin Russandol,” disappeared when his supposedly fool-proof ambush was counter-ambushed by the Dark Lord Morgoth over a century ago.

Findekáno reportedly found his cousin hanging from one hand on a mountain and was about to prove his archery skills when the Eagle suggested he use a melee weapon instead. Findekáno, who placed ten thousandth in the All-Valinor Knifework and Lockpicking Competition a hundred and twelve years in a row, apparently missed his blow, hitting his cousin in the wrist instead of the chain he’d been aiming for.

“It was a good blow,” Findekáno insisted. “I managed to take off his hand in one cut, which I’ve never been able to do before. And I didn’t even drop the knife! Thorondor managed to catch Cousin Russandol, although he accidentally swallowed his hand, so I guess they’re not reattaching it anytime soon. And Thorondor was so sorry about it he even offered to give us a ride home!”

Thorondor, colloquially known as the greatest of Eagles and quite possibly the hand of the King of the Valar in Middle-earth, added that he would love to give more rides to Noldor, especially those who are “going hunting or expected to lose a limb or two in the near future.” 

He then added, “I would like to clarify that we are not a ferry service, however, and should not be ridden lightly. Also, no journeys longer than three days.” To summon Thorondor, just go to an open field with at least a hand’s worth of meat and shout his name until he responds.

Neither possibly-still-current-High King Nelyafinwë Maitimo, nor any members of his court, could be reached for comment.

@greenekangaroo @urloth
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elenothar:

I keep thinking about how Newt and Theseus were ‘discovered’ to be Eluréd and Elurín.

..for some reason, I typically see the scene set in the Golden Wood, shortly after Newt and Graves’ wedding - which, as we’ve previously worldbuilt, was officiated by Radagast, and attended/witnessed by both Theseus and Arwen. …it was also subject to an orc ambush midway through, with Graves and Newt shouting out their vows mid-battle a la At World’s End. (Theseus bawled as he beheaded a charging orc.)

Newt and Graves (as well as Theseus and Arwen) subsequently traveled to Lothlorien - perhaps because even though there’s a special kind of pleasure in wandering beneath the stars, it’s really very nice to sleep in a proper bed in a lovely place where there is ABSOLUTELY NO CHANCE of being ambushed by Orcs in the middle of the night. (Also, Theseus insisted on toasting his brother and his new brother-in-law.) …which was when the rest of Elrond’s contingent caught up with them.

…apparently, leaving a letter that, paraphrased, stated ‘Newt accepted my proposal of marriage; Arwen agreed to serve as my witness. I am hereby notifying you of the fact that I am taking advantage of several centuries’ worth of accumulated vacation time to get married and go on my honeymoon’ was - not the most suitable way Graves could have employed to notify Lord Elrond of his impending marriage.

The news hit Rivendell - and, subsequently, elvish society at large - like a battering ram. It was the event of the decade; Percival Graves - orNoirëion Laicaethë, to use his ‘proper’ elvish name - got married. To a wood-elf. A Noldor, one of the vanishingly rare survivors of Gondolin, famed warrior, loyal until death and beyond, who had lived through fire, floor, and the War of Wrath - got married. To a wood-elf of no pedigree whatsoever.

It was a scandal. It was news. And some people tried very hard to object.

Not Elrond, or any of the people who really mattered to Newt and Graves - Graves, for one, was getting steadily more irate as various elves he’d never even met before kept harping on about how Graves was better then this, how he wasn’t thinking this through, how - Newt was growing even more and more quiet, practically hiding behind Graves as Theseus bristled and stepped forward to his defense -

Which was when Galadriel stepped in.

Galadriel, and her Mirror. Which, among other properties, can show ’Things that were’.

(When pressed, Galadriel will later state that she felt something, a hidden knowledge that needed to be made plain - a secret, hidden by years, unknown even to those who carried it.)

And the Mirror showed the past.

Specifically, Newt and Theseus’ past.

The accumulated elves flinched in shared memory as the Mirror showed the grim scene of the War of the Last Alliance - and there was Theseus, reckless grin on his face as he fought alongside the rest of the infantry. There was Newt, soothing horses as he joined a cavalry charge.

The Mirror swirls, and another image is shown.

There is Newt, caring for a badger in the middle of a forest. There is Theseus, a song on his lips as he guards a group of travelers making for the Grey Haven.

A ripple of water, and the scene changes.

There is Newt and Theseus - but younger, elves barely into adulthood as they march with one of the refugee bands that traced their way from lost Beleriand during the War of Wrath. And the mirror is going faster now, and Newt feels Theseus’ hand tighten upon his own as they see their own faces as children, and the faces of the elves who adopted them , and then -

Then, the faces of Men. And the encampment which was their earliest memory - and the onlookers can see them now, a pair of thin, dirty elf-children, hungrily gulping down the stew that they were offered.

“They found us in the forest.” Theseus says quietly, eyes fixed on the worn, tired faces of their human foster-parents. “Just a pair of orphans, running from the war. We didn’t remember much - too traumatized, I suppose. We couldn’t even remember even our own names - they fed us and took us in and named us.” Newt nods silently, eyes hungrily drinking down the sight of the long-dead humans who had been the first to love them.

The Mirror is swirling even as they watch, shifting to the sight of two painfully young elves - barely more then toddlers, but still recognizable as Newt and Theseus - making their way through a dark wood. And then it dips and swirls and resolves one last time -

And there is Newt and Theseus, as younglings, barely more then infants, clasped tight and secure in the arms of a pair of elves who must be their birth-parents - the resemblance is all too striking, and Newt and Theseus stare at the unfamiliar faces of their biological parents, trying their best to sear the image into memory. They do not recognize them; their features mean nothing to the twins - but a great susurration erupts from the assembled elves who do know them - and who even now are putting the pieces together.

And Galadriel lets the mirror flicker and fade into nothing, voice and face regal as she draws air to speak.

“Hail!” Cries the Lady of the Wood in a great voice. “Hail Eluréd and Elurín Diorion! Hail to the sons of Dior, son of Beren and Luthien, who return to us now beyond hope, beyond fear, beyond expectation! Hail, princes of lost Doriath, brothers to Elwing, kinsmen to the Star of High Hope! Elen sila lumenn’ omentielvo!”

…and then things get very loud indeed.
rakasha: (Default)
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So you’re positing that an elf would either have had to see the light of the trees or have strong Maia blood in them to do it? I don’t think there’s any evidence that Dior or any of the other descendants of Melian can do it, though I suppose they might just be a bit more subtle about it. Honestly, I think if Newt and theseus could do it it would’ve come out a lot earlier that they are the lost princes.
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Hmm. If they ever saw a Silmaril, I think the memory would’ve stuck. The Silmaril are literally The most magical objects, their light enchants etc. Maybe Newt and Theseus do remember a bright, beautiful light, but memory is fickle and they have no idea that it’s a Silmaril they remember.
rakasha: (Default)
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nimloth:

favourite poems by J. R. R. Tolkien: [1/?]

↳ Frodo’s Lament for Gandalf 
rakasha: (Default)
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elenothar:

hamelin-born:

Today has been a good day. I have managed to get my hands on not only The Book of Lost Tales but also Morgoth’s Ring. Specifically, the section entitled ‘Of the Laws and Customs Among the Eldar’. Which has sparked various thoughts regarding mine and @elenothar​ ‘s ongoing Lord of the Rings/Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them worldbuild. See below for some of my musings!

Canonically, Eluréd and Elurín were six or seven years old when the Second Kinslaying descended upon Dorianth. However, it is also canonical that elvish children mature at a vastly slower rate then do humans; assuming that the twin followed elvish developmental patterns (they did have human ancestry), they might have had the physical appearance of three to four year old children. Little more then toddlers. That - really puts it into perspective. Tolkien also states that Eldar mentally mature at a much faster rate then do humans, but trauma and mental and physical shock could have induced psychogenic amnesia. (My knowledge of psychogenic amnesia is strictly obtained from wiki, so there is every possibility that I might be wrong).

Newt and Theseus would have been children. They might have seen their parents die; they would have been taken from all that was familiar and driven into the wilderness to die of cold and hunger. They would have had nothing left but each other - Graves tries not to think about it. Newt and Theseus have spent literally years trying not to think about it; their earliest recollections - of fear and hunger and darkness - are not particularly pleasant ones. The twins have - mixed feelings about their lack of memories of what transpired before. Prior to the revelation of their heritage, the temptation of knowing their true backgrounds was a factor - but. But even if it had been a possibility, they weren’t sure if they wanted to know who they were before the gap in their memories. The twins had foster-parents that they loved among both humans and the avari; they know who they are. They like who they are. 

Despite it not being strictly necessary, apparently there are uniquely elvish wedding traditions. …Newt, for one, wouldn’t care about a traditional ceremony. Percival, on the other hand - well, he might not particularly mind either (Graves is practical; it’s one of his defining characteristics) but he might also feel that Newt deserves every courtesy and honor that he can bestow. Namely, a year-long betrothal, as jointly agreed upon/announced by the families of the spouses-to-be, and the exchange of silver rings - which are later swapped for gold in the actual ceremony.

…Newt’s only known family (at that time) is Theseus; Graves, on the other hand, doesn’t have any blood kin remaining; however, the House of Elrond has always regarded him as both a longstanding ally and family in some vague, undefined way. (He’s been a constant of their respective childhoods, served and watched and guarded them all these years…) As such, Graves goes to the only member of Elrond’s family he admires for their practicality, fellow-feeling, and capability not to spread around the news that he’s getting married.

…which means that the marriage is formally agreed upon approved by Theseus and Arwen. The latter is delighted. The former somewhat less so. (His brother! His little brother is getting married! Newt politely asks one of the wolves-not-wargs-why-would-you-think-they’re-wargs? to sit on him until he calms down) Newt thinks this is all very silly, but it makes Percy happy, so why not? 

A marriage feast followed by the actual ceremony is also traditional; in this case, the ‘feast’ in question was a picnic in the middle of Mirkwood forest, and the ceremony was officiated by Radagast instead of the parents of the spouses - considering that none of said parents were actually living, and getting the knot tied by a Maia is definitely something. Apparently, it’s tradition among the Noldor for the parents to give their new offspring-in-law a ‘jewel upon a chain or collar’; Arwen, acting on Graves’ behalf, might give Newt a pretty necklace or something.

…of course, none of the above is strictly necessary considering that apparently it’s the wedding night that is the actual act of marriage, with everything else being ceremonial and not really needed. I’m choosing to believe that there’s some kind of mutual intent needed between the parties in question to forge said marriage. Or is casual sex just - not a thing among elves?

With regards to Gondolin - I wonder what House Graves belonged to? I’m tempted to say he was a guard/soldier in the House of the King, considering his canonical rank in MACUSA - the seat of power. Individuals in said house consisted of “the King’s family and bodyguard.“ Then again, he could be a member of the House of the Wing - “The bodyguard of Tuor, and the smallest house.” If Graves was a member of either House - that could also be one reason why he sticks close to the descendants of Turgon/Tuor (in addition to his sense of duty); they’re basically the only semi-family he has left.

…I’m actually pretty sure he was a member of the House of the Wing, seeing as how The Book of Lost Tales states that the member of the House of the King basically stayed with Turgon to the last and died alongside him. Also, there’s a pretty good likelihood that the House of the Wing might have had one of the highest survival rates of the various populations in Gondolin - considering how they basically followed Tuor, and how Tuor was the one who led the evacuation.

“Mighty was the array of the house of the king and their colors were white and gold and red, and their emblems the moon and the sun and the scarlet heart…” That’s the House of the King. The House of the Wing - “All these wore wings as it were of swans or gulls upon their helms, and the emblem of the White Wing was upon their shields.” I wonder if Graves has any physical remembrances - any tokens, or badges of office, or anything from that time?

Just - Graves. Graves, looking out over the walls of Gondolin during what was supposed to be a holiday, and seeing the plains teaming with dragons and fire-serpents, orcs and balrogs. Being there when the northern gate fell and the orcs poured into the city, killing everyone in their path. He saw the House of the Hammer of Wrath die to a man; he might even have seen Ecthelion slay Gothmog, Lord of Balrogs. He ran with the rest of the survivors across the plains, in that last desperate rush - and there’s a strong likelihood that he witnessed Glorfindel’s last stand.

Also - @elenothar​ , remember how we talked about just how many elves survived the Fall of Gondolin? The Book of Lost Tales says that 580 survived to resettle at the Mouths of Sirion. I looked up some speculation online - apparently, Gondolin was able to field an army at least 10,000 strong in the Battle of Unnumbered Tears, meaning the city had - about 30,000 people, maybe?

…meaning about 2% of the population of Gondolin managed to escape.

…Graves can sympathize with Newt to a rather large extent regarding his spouse’s disinclination to listen or sing about his family. Graves was present at some of the events that elves love to sing about - the fall of Gondolin, the battles of Ecthelion and Glorfindel, the death of the House of the Hammer - they’re not good memories.

I’m so here for the idea of Graves being sort of unofficially adopted by the House of Elrond. Arwen is delighted when he asks her about standing with him at the wedding - she knows Graves well enough to realise what a huge show of trust that is. (Elladan and Elrohir are definitely not going to hear the news from her, though it’s inescapable that they’ll eventually find out and start the teasing.) Newt, though he usually finds jewelry impractical, always wears the small chain that Arwen gives him on behalf of Graves. It’s in the shape of a wing because of Graves’ house. Graves as part of the House of the Wing actually makes a lot of sense to me - plus I really like the assocation of him with birds (you know, some kind of proud bird of prey?). I think he may wear a discrete wing embroidered on his cloak, maybe, but generally he doesn’t advertise who he is and where he comes from. But he can’t bear to be entirely without reminders - he not only feels he owes Gondolin and all his fallen kin that much, but it’s also a part of him.

… Oh man, do you think he might have some ridiculous helmet with wings stashed away somewhere? He never wears it, of course, didn’t even like wearing it back in Gondolin unless it was an official function and he had to. Tuor probably teased him about that. Given that Tuor only arrived in Gondolin fairly close to its end, maybe Graves was a high-ranking guard and member of the House of Kings before his arrival and Turgon assigned him to Tuor and the newly formed House of the Wing as a sign of his favour and trust in his new son in law? After all, his daughter’s husband should have the best security bar the king’s. Or did the House of the Wing already exist and just shifted its responsibilities to Tuor?

I didn’t even think of the fact that Graves would know Glorfindel (have seen him die) before now. Maybe that’s part of the reason he’s drawn to Rivendell? Actually, wouldn’t Glorfindel be a good choice to come to the wedding as well? He’s not kin, but he is one of the very few survivors of Gondolin that Graves knows about who hasn’t returned across the sea. 

2%. Jfc. Sometimes I forget that all of the Silmarillion is pain.

Graves has been a longstanding ally of Elrond’s family since before Elrond himself was born; he served Turgon, Elrond’s great-grandfather, Tuor, Elrond’s grandfather, Eärendil, Elrond’s father -  who himself probably regarded him as a close friend and surrogate uncle. Graves is loyal - and he’s been a constant in Elrond’s household for a very long time. Tuor probably released his men of all obligation to him and his House a long, long time ago - but Graves still stayed. I’d imagine that there’s little that Graves would ask that the house of Elrond would not willingly give him. Which might be one reason they were so worried when he started to go on longer and longer trips in the wilderness, looking for a fight, for a challenge, for something. And it’s also another reason that Arwen would be honored and delighted to help the elf who had given everything for her family and never asked for a thing in return.

…of course, it turns out that Graves really is family when the truth of his husband’s background becomes known. He’s literal Elrond’s uncle-in-law now - Arwen and the Twins probably start calling him that immediately.

I was under the impression that the emblem of the House of the Wing was more along the lines of a swan-wing, but a bird of prey sounds - quite suitable for Graves. I also now have the sudden mental image of Graves having a cloak shaped like a pair of folded wings that he keeps stuffed in the very back of his closet. It can keep company with that ridiculous winged helmet - which he hates, but can’t bring himself to throw away. Considering that Morgoth’s forces attacked on a holiday - a day when everyone would be dressed in their most ornate, ceremonial wear - there’s a high likelihood that said helmet is the one that he wore during the Fall of Gondolin and carried to the Mouths of Sirion.

…perhaps the fact that said attack took place during that time meant that Graves was lucky (?) enough to be carrying/wearing the more formal heirlooms of his family, meaning that they weren’t lost when the City fell. He was probably shocked when Orcrist and Glamdring turned up again; he never thought he’d see those again in his lifetime. Also, didn’t we speculate that his own sword was - nothing spectacular or out of legend, but a good sword that’s been with him through many battles - and yes, it glows blue in the presence of orcs.

I like the headcanon that Graves transferred from the House of the King to the House of the Wing! I don’t know much about the size of the latter, except that it’s mentioned to be the smallest of all the houses. Google-fu doesn’t provide any answers on that front either, but - well. Tuor led them (except for the guards he left with his wife and child) through the thick of the fight; I wouldn’t be surprised if they sustained heavy casualties. I also wonder just how many survivors of lost Gondolin remained in Middle Earth during the time period of The Lord of the Rings? The Havens, where most of them ended up at, were destroyed by the Feanorians; I don’t - think many survived. Honestly, I’m surprised that more of them didn’t seek the Sea when the option was presented to them. As it is - Graves lost his city, what remained of his family, and most of the people that he knew during the Fall of Gondolin, and he’s had to sit and watch as war, sorrow, and time whittled away the few survivors. I wouldn’t be surprised if he’s one of the few members of the House of the Wing - maybe the last member - on this side of the Sea.

Graves and Newt probably keep their wedding/betrothal quiet - not because they care about what other people think of them, but because it simply isn’t in either of their natures to make a production out of it. And it really, really isn’t anyone else’s business. Although once the Noldor custom of providing necklaces as a gift is explained to the Scamanders… well. I now have the mental image of Theseus showing up sometime after the wedding and handing Percival a necklace, apologizing that it took him so long - he wasn’t aware of the custom before Arwen explained it to him, and it took him a while to save up for something nice. Theseus actually commissioned it from the Dwarves - it’s a silver warg’s tooth, or something along those lines, and might also make for a weapon of last resort. 

Apparently Thingol’s emblem - which might be the one the Scamanders could claim by right by right of descent (they wouldn’t. They actually literally run away whenever anyone suggests as much - although I wouldn’t be surprised if Graves’ winged cloak and helmet share the space in the back of the wardrobe with a cloak emblazoned with said heraldry) - was a “winged moon on black surrounded by stars”. Odd coincidence.

I don’t think Glorfindel and Graves are particularly close - they knew one another in Goldolin by sight, but they never really talked or moved in the same circles. In Rivendell, they’re on a more equal level, and help coordinate the defense of the valley - and, rarely, they might sometimes just sit and remember. But they’re still not friends, or at least not close enough that Graves would invite him to his wedding - either that, or he simply didn’t trust the ex-Head of the House of the Golden Flower not to keep his mouth shut.
rakasha: (Default)
via http://ift.tt/2f2T3vY:
Hmm. If they ever saw a Silmaril, I think the memory would’ve stuck. The Silmaril are literally The most magical objects, their light enchants etc. Maybe Newt and Theseus do remember a bright, beautiful light, but memory is fickle and they have no idea that it’s a Silmaril they remember.
rakasha: (Default)
via http://ift.tt/2xr1KdT:
So you’re positing that an elf would either have had to see the light of the trees or have strong Maia blood in them to do it? I don’t think there’s any evidence that Dior or any of the other descendants of Melian can do it, though I suppose they might just be a bit more subtle about it. Honestly, I think if Newt and theseus could do it it would’ve come out a lot earlier that they are the lost princes.
rakasha: (Default)
via http://ift.tt/2xcf59r:
… All I can think of is Elrond face-palming so hard. He did not ask for all these badgers to suddenly set up a perimeter around Rivendell, nor the deer to come warn them of orc activity, or bears lumbering out from the woods to surprise an orc hunting party. The birds become even chattier than normal.

Whenever Newt is in the vicinity he acquires an entourage. Graves gets used to it eventually. (But not before nearly jumping out of his skin when Newt shows up with a wolf in tow one day. Misunderstood creatures. Right.)
rakasha: (Default)
via http://ift.tt/2wlFanJ:
Today has been a good day. I have managed to get my hands on not only The Book of Lost Tales but also Morgoth’s Ring. Specifically, the section entitled ‘Of the Laws and Customs Among the Eldar’. Which has sparked various thoughts regarding mine and @elenothar​ ‘s ongoing Lord of the Rings/Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them worldbuild. See below for some of my musings!

Canonically, Eluréd and Elurín were six or seven years old when the Second Kinslaying descended upon Dorianth. However, it is also canonical that elvish children mature at a vastly slower rate then do humans; assuming that the twin followed elvish developmental patterns (they did have human ancestry), they might have had the physical appearance of three to four year old children. Little more then toddlers. That - really puts it into perspective. Tolkien also states that Eldar mentally mature at a much faster rate then do humans, but trauma and mental and physical shock could have induced psychogenic amnesia. (My knowledge of psychogenic amnesia is strictly obtained from wiki, so there is every possibility that I might be wrong).

Newt and Theseus would have been children. They might have seen their parents die; they would have been taken from all that was familiar and driven into the wilderness to die of cold and hunger. They would have had nothing left but each other - Graves tries not to think about it. Newt and Theseus have spent literally years trying not to think about it; their earliest recollections - of fear and hunger and darkness - are not particularly pleasant ones. The twins have - mixed feelings about their lack of memories of what transpired before. Prior to the revelation of their heritage, the temptation of knowing their true backgrounds was a factor - but. But even if it had been a possibility, they weren’t sure if they wanted to know who they were before the gap in their memories. The twins had foster-parents that they loved among both humans and the avari; they know who they are. They like who they are. 

Despite it not being strictly necessary, apparently there are uniquely elvish wedding traditions. …Newt, for one, wouldn’t care about a traditional ceremony. Percival, on the other hand - well, he might not particularly mind either (Graves is practical; it’s one of his defining characteristics) but he might also feel that Newt deserves every courtesy and honor that he can bestow. Namely, a year-long betrothal, as jointly agreed upon/announced by the families of the spouses-to-be, and the exchange of silver rings - which are later swapped for gold in the actual ceremony.

…Newt’s only known family (at that time) is Theseus; Graves, on the other hand, doesn’t have any blood kin remaining; however, the House of Elrond has always regarded him as both a longstanding ally and family in some vague, undefined way. (He’s been a constant of their respective childhoods, served and watched and guarded them all these years…) As such, Graves goes to the only member of Elrond’s family he admires for their practicality, fellow-feeling, and capability not to spread around the news that he’s getting married.

…which means that the marriage is formally agreed upon approved by Theseus and Arwen. The latter is delighted. The former somewhat less so. (His brother! His little brother is getting married! Newt politely asks one of the wolves-not-wargs-why-would-you-think-they’re-wargs? to sit on him until he calms down) Newt thinks this is all very silly, but it makes Percy happy, so why not? 

A marriage feast followed by the actual ceremony is also traditional; in this case, the ‘feast’ in question was a picnic in the middle of Mirkwood forest, and the ceremony was officiated by Radagast instead of the parents of the spouses - considering that none of said parents were actually living, and getting the knot tied by a Maia is definitely something. Apparently, it’s tradition among the Noldor for the parents to give their new offspring-in-law a ‘jewel upon a chain or collar’; Arwen, acting on Graves’ behalf, might give Newt a pretty necklace or something.

…of course, none of the above is strictly necessary considering that apparently it’s the wedding night that is the actual act of marriage, with everything else being ceremonial and not really needed. I’m choosing to believe that there’s some kind of mutual intent needed between the parties in question to forge said marriage. Or is casual sex just - not a thing among elves?

With regards to Gondolin - I wonder what House Graves belonged to? I’m tempted to say he was a guard/soldier in the House of the King, considering his canonical rank in MACUSA - the seat of power. Individuals in said house consisted of “the King’s family and bodyguard.“ Then again, he could be a member of the House of the Wing - “The bodyguard of Tuor, and the smallest house.” If Graves was a member of either House - that could also be one reason why he sticks close to the descendants of Turgon/Tuor (in addition to his sense of duty); they’re basically the only semi-family he has left.

…I’m actually pretty sure he was a member of the House of the Wing, seeing as how The Book of Lost Tales states that the member of the House of the King basically stayed with Turgon to the last and died alongside him. Also, there’s a pretty good likelihood that the House of the Wing might have had one of the highest survival rates of the various populations in Gondolin - considering how they basically followed Tuor, and how Tuor was the one who led the evacuation.

“Mighty was the array of the house of the king and their colors were white and gold and red, and their emblems the moon and the sun and the scarlet heart…” That’s the House of the King. The House of the Wing - “All these wore wings as it were of swans or gulls upon their helms, and the emblem of the White Wing was upon their shields.” I wonder if Graves has any physical remembrances - any tokens, or badges of office, or anything from that time?

Just - Graves. Graves, looking out over the walls of Gondolin during what was supposed to be a holiday, and seeing the plains teaming with dragons and fire-serpents, orcs and balrogs. Being there when the northern gate fell and the orcs poured into the city, killing everyone in their path. He saw the House of the Hammer of Wrath die to a man; he might even have seen Ecthelion slay Gothmog, Lord of Balrogs. He ran with the rest of the survivors across the plains, in that last desperate rush - and there’s a strong likelihood that he witnessed Glorfindel’s last stand.

Also - @elenothar​ , remember how we talked about just how many elves survived the Fall of Gondolin? The Book of Lost Tales says that 580 survived to resettle at the Mouths of Sirion. I looked up some speculation online - apparently, Gondolin was able to field an army at least 10,000 strong in the Battle of Unnumbered Tears, meaning the city had - about 30,000 people, maybe?

…meaning about 2% of the population of Gondolin managed to escape.

…Graves can sympathize with Newt to a rather large extent regarding his spouse’s disinclination to listen or sing about his family. Graves was present at some of the events that elves love to sing about - the fall of Gondolin, the battles of Ecthelion and Glorfindel, the death of the House of the Hammer - they’re not good memories.
rakasha: (Default)
via http://ift.tt/2y6M3FO:
the-noldorin:

mirkwood elves aesthetic

“The feasting people were Wood-elves, of course. These are not wicked folk. If they have a fault it is distrust of strangers. Though their magic was strong, even in those days they were wary. They differed from the High Elves of the West, and were more dangerous and less wise.”
rakasha: (Default)
via http://ift.tt/2wjdlww:
Sudden Terrible Realization: I’m going to have to hunt down a copy of Tolkien’s The Book of Lost Tales, aren’t I. *sobs silently as I page through page after page of the Silmarillion looking for the details that simply aren’t there.*

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